Prof. Robin Jensen Refutes Any Claim that She Concurs with the Interpretation in “The Jesus Discovery”

From Prof. Robin Jensen, Vanderbilt University In December, 2010, I was asked to participate in a National Geographic film project that—I was led to believe—would investigate the image of Jonah in early Christian art. I was asked to fly to Rome in January in order to be filmed in the catacombs and comment on the […]

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On ‘Absalom’s Tomb’ in Jerusalem and Nephesh Monument Iconography: A Response to Jacobovici and Tabor by Robert Cargill

By: Robert R. Cargill (robert-cargill@uiowa.edu) Assistant Professor of Classics and Religious Studies, The University of Iowa (more…)

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Jodi Magness responds to the “New Jesus Discovery”

Professor Jodi Magness Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill As usual, the arrival of the Easter season this year is heralded by a sensational archaeological claim relating to Jesus. In March 2007, we learned from a TV documentary and accompanying book that the tomb of Jesus and his family had […]

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Reflections of an Epigrapher on Talpiyot Tombs A and B: A Detailed Response to the Claims of Professor James Tabor and Filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici

Professor Christopher A. Rollston (crollston@ecs.edu) Professor of Semitic Studies, Emmanuel Christian Seminary I. THE CLAIMS OF TABOR AND JACOBOVICI: THE NEW BOOK[1] Here are the basic claims of James Tabor and Simcha Jacobovici: “Talpiyot Tomb B contained several ossuaries, or bone boxes, two of which were carved with an iconic image and a Greek inscription.  Taken […]

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Eric Meyers’ review of “The New Jesus Discovery”

Review of “The New Jesus Discovery” (Simon and Schuster 2012, ISBN 978-1-4516-5040-2) Eric M.Meyers, Duke University For nearly two millennia Christians have venerated the site believed to be where Jesus was buried. The Church of the Holy Sepulcher was built at a place where liturgical celebrations were held in honor of Christ’s death and resurrection, […]

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Brief Reflections of an Epigrapher on Talpiyot Tombs A and B

Professor Christopher A. Rollston, Emmanuel Christian Seminary Much can, and no doubt will, be said about the proposal (and new volume) of Professor James Tabor and Filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici that Jesus of Nazareth was married to a woman of Magdala named Mary, that they had a son named “Judas” and that their tomb has been […]

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Meyers and Rollston are guest editors for ASOR’s coverage of the “New Jesus Discovery”

Professors Eric Meyers and Christopher Rollston will be the guest editors of the ASOR Blog for the month of March. ASOR plans to invite scholars in ASOR and the field to react to the proposals made by Professor James Tabor and Filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici in their new book, The New Jesus Discovery. The ASOR Blog […]

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Archaeology in the News!

A 6,500-year-old Sumerian gold jar, the head of a Sumerian battle axe and a stone from an Assyrian palace were among 45 relics returned to Iraq by Germany recently. The objects had all been looted from Iraq’s museums and archeological sites following the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. Archaeologists have made an extraordinary find 13 miles west of […]

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ASOR Platt Fellow explores Ottoman water system

Due in part to the Platt Fellowship offered by ASOR, I was able to participate in the Tel Akko Total Archaeology Project and Field School. This unique field school combines excavation, survey, geographic information systems (GIS), conservation, and public archaeology in order to immerse students into a holistic archaeological experience. The Tel Akko project and […]

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Archaeology in the News!

A British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba of biblical legend derived her fabled treasures. An enormous ancient goldmine, together with the ruins of a temple and the site of a battlefield, have been discovered in her former territory in Ethiopia. A […]

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ASOR Heritage Fellow explores the Epipaleolithic

Thanks to the generous ASOR Heritage Fellowship, from late June till early August 2011, I participated in the excavations of the Upper and Epipaleolithic site of Wadi Madamagh in the Petra region in Jordan. The excavation was part of the Western Highlands Early Epipaleolithic Project directed by Dr. Deborah Olszewski from University of Pennsylvania in […]

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Archaeology in the News!

A 1,500-year-old seal with the image of the seven-branched Temple Menorah has been discovered near the city of Acre. The ceramic stamp, which dates from the Byzantine period in the 6th century CE, was found during ongoing Israel Antiquities Authority excavations at Horbat Uza, east of Acre, which are being undertaken before the construction of the […]

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ASOR Heritage Fellow works at Bronze Age site in Lebanon

By: Antonietta Catanzariti, Heritage Fellow The 2011 excavation season at Kamid el-Loz, a site located in the central Beqa’a Valley of Lebanon, produced exciting and important results. It was only thanks to the Heritage Fellowship that I was able to participate in this campaign, conducted by the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität of Freiburg, and take part in these […]

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Archaeology in the News!

Recent stories from the world of archaeology! The Penn Museum celebrates its 125th anniversary year by placing an arguably incomparable collection of ancient artifacts online for the world to see. The Penn Museum Online Collections Database is designed as a utility for scholars to obtain preliminary information on artifacts for research purposes, for teachers and students […]

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