THE OTHER DEAD SEA SCROLLS: CONSIDERING THE ARAMAIC TEXTS FROM QUMRAN

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By: Daniel A. Machiela

When most people think of the Dead Sea Scrolls, they likely (and understandably) envision either a devoted band of Jewish sectarians sequestered away in the harsh Judean wilderness, or a stunning cache of biblical manuscripts centuries older than we possessed before the late 1940’s. These two groups of texts – the Sectarian and the Biblical Scrolls – remain, for good reason, at the center of current museum exhibits and our popular imagination, though many important complexities have been introduced into discussions surrounding each group in recent decades. Yet there are a good many manuscripts from among the Scrolls that do not fit neatly into these two categories, (more…)

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5 Comments for : THE OTHER DEAD SEA SCROLLS: CONSIDERING THE ARAMAIC TEXTS FROM QUMRAN
    • Jim
    • September 20, 2012
    Reply

    a very fine essay. thanks for it.

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    • Geoff Hudson
    • September 21, 2012
    Reply

    "It is to our great benefit that pieces of this literature made their way to the humble, austere environs of Qumran, quite probably in the hands of some who joined the sect."

    Machiela continues the myth that there was a sect resident at Qumran! So just how did Aramaic literature, that Machiela says originated in the 3rd to 2nd centuries BC, get to Qumran?

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  3. Reply

    Dear Daniel

    Who was the son of Onias III in 159 – 152 BCE?

    from

    John Stuart

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