The Practice of Repairing Vessels in Ancient Egypt: Methods of Repair and Anthropological Implications

Posted in: ASOR, Near Eastern Archaeology, Pottery
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Near Eastern Archaeology Vol. 79, No. 4, December 2016 article, “The Practice of Repairing Vessels in Ancient Egypt: Methods of Repair and Anthropological Implications,” by Julia Hsieh (Yale).

Before mass production, the practice of repairing ceramic and stone vessels, as well as other household items, was widely practiced, from antiquity into the last century. This article provides a brief overview of the methods of repair and highlights some of the anthropological implications of the practice, namely, what information might we extract regarding the individual, the settlement, or even the societal group as a whole, when we unearth an assemblage that includes repaired vessels?

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1 Comments for : The Practice of Repairing Vessels in Ancient Egypt: Methods of Repair and Anthropological Implications
  1. Pingback: The Practice of Repairing Vessels in Ancient Egypt: Methods of Repair and Anthropological Implications | The ASOR Blog | Talmidimblogging

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