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Archaeology in the News!

Here are some links to recent news from the world of archaeology!

A plaster covered structure, likely a ritual bath (or mikveh in Hebrew), dated to the Second Temple period (first century BCE-first century CE) was unearthed during an archaeological excavation near Kibbutz Zor’a in Israel.

Ancient structures uncovered in Turkey and thought to be the world’s oldest temples may not have been strictly religious buildings after all, according to an article in the October issue of Current Anthropology. Archaeologist Ted Banning of the University of Toronto argues that the buildings found at Göbekli Tepe may have been houses for people, not the gods.

South America’s ancient Inca rulers didn’t establish the largest empire in the New World by being sweethearts. But their reputation as warmongers, at least according to some influential 16th- and 17th-century Spanish accounts of Inca history, appears to be undeserved, a new study of skeletal remains suggests.

Archeologists believe they have made a “major” discovery of remains dating back to the famed 1759 Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City.

Archaeologists found a round Aztec ceremonial platform studded with stone carvings of serpent heads at Mexico City’s Templo Mayor ruin, raising hopes in the search for an emperor’s tomb.

Archaeologists say they’ve discovered the ruins of what is believed to be Peru’s oldest Roman Catholic church.

Archaeologists in northern Greece have found a rare group of ancient graves where farmers were interred with their livestock, a Greek daily reported on Friday.

A miniature airborne drone has helped archaeologists capture images for creating a 3-D model of an ancient burial mound in Russia, scientists say.

The remains of three Palaeolithic dogs, including one with a mammoth bone in its mouth, have been unearthed at Předmostí in the Czech Republic.

Evidence reveals what the Donner Party ate during their final days of being snowbound in the Sierra Nevada.

Dr. Eilat Mazar, an archaeologist who worked with the Elad association in Jerusalem’s City of David claims that the association and the Antiquities Authority are carrying out excavations “without any commitment to scientific archaeological work.”

The discovery of a Maori adze beneath the demolished Lyttleton post office has provided physical evidence for an oral history dating back more than 800 years.

Archaeologists in east China’s Jiangxi Province have unearthed more than 50 pieces of cultural relics from a cluster of tombs dating back about 1,400 years, sources with the provincial archaeological institution said Tuesday.

A huge early Celtic calendar construction has been discovered in the royal tomb of Magdalenenberg, nearby Villingen-Schwenningen in the Black Forest.

Diving archaeologists are in the midst of a monthlong expedition to the sunken wreckage of the pirate Blackbeard’s ship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, off the North Carolina coast, but the weather is not cooperating.

An extremely rare Egyptian coffin, possibly belonging to the son of a king or a very senior official, has been ‘discovered’ at Torquay Museum by an archaeologist at the University of Bristol.

Following nine months of delay, an American-Egyptian mission responsible for lowering ground water at archaeological sites in Luxor resumed its work today. The project aims to decrease the subterranean water level that has affected the foundation stones of five temples in Luxor: Karnak and Luxor temples on the east bank, and Seti I, the Ramessium, and Merneptah and Haremhab on the west bank.

In both Jewish and Christian traditions, Moses is considered the author of the Torah, the first five books of the Bible. Scholars have furnished evidence that multiple writers had a hand in composing the text of the Torah. Other books of the Hebrew Bible and of the New Testament are also thought to be composites. However, delineating these multiple sources has been a laborious task.

Interested in teaching archaeology to kids? Check out this Bill Nye episode!

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Archaeology in the News! Reviewed by on . Here are some links to recent news from the world of archaeology! A plaster covered structure, likely a ritual bath (or mikveh in Hebrew), dated to the Second T Here are some links to recent news from the world of archaeology! A plaster covered structure, likely a ritual bath (or mikveh in Hebrew), dated to the Second T Rating:
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