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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 11-30-12

There are easier places to make wine than the spectacular, desolate landscapes of southeast Turkey, but DNA analysis suggests it is here that Stone Age farmers first domesticated the wine grape.

Harvard professor Jason Ur has launched a five-year archaeological project in Iraq—the first such Harvard-led endeavor in the war-torn nation since the early 1930s—to scour a 3,200-square-kilometer area around Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish region in northern Iraq, for signs of ancient cities and towns, canals, and roads.

Archaeologists in England and Wales are struggling to cope with the number of artefacts discovered by members of the public. Nearly 100,000 finds were made last year and reported to authorities, the largest amount since in 1997, when a system for voluntarily recording objects found in the ground was introduced.

Chinese archaeologists have excavated a large Spring and Autumn Period (770-403 BCE) burial, complete with chariots, bronze ritual vessels, bronze bells, and jades.

Steeped in myth and legend, the “Penacho”, a feather headdress supposedly worn by Aztec emperor Moctezuma II, continues to stir up passion in Austria and Mexico as it goes on display again after a years-long restoration.

A French archaeological mission from the French Institute for Archaeological Studies have unearthed a yet unidentified royal statue of a New Kingdom king during routine excavations at Monthu Temple, northeast of Karnak Temple in Luxor.

The underwater shipwreck excavation of the wreck of the ship Mentor, that sank off the island of Kythera in 1802 while carrying goods plundered from the Parthenon by British diplomat Lord Elgin has proved to be a treasure trove of personal items from the passengers and crew.

A noble-but-brutal Renaissance warrior who fell to a battle wound may not have died exactly as historians had believed, according to a new investigation of the man’s bones.

 Fragments of marble sculptures from a monument consecrated to the nymphs of ancient Greek and Roman mythology have been uncovered during on-going excavations at Paphos’ ancient theatre, the archaeological team in charge of the dig have announced.

Construction has uncovered what may be the foundations of the largest Hindu temple complex in Bali. Head of Bali’s Archeology Unit, Made Geria, says the discovery is unique due to the scale of the stones used in the ancient temple’s foundations and their location.

Few people have ever visited the long network of underground tunnels under the public baths of Caracalla, which date back to the third century AD. This underground network, which is due to be reopened in December, is also home to a separate structure, the largest Mithraeum in the Roman Empire, according to its director Marina Piranomonte.

Dr. Penny Spikins argues that trust rather than lust is at the heart of the attention to detail and finely made form of handaxes from around 1.7 million years ago. And suggests a desire to prove trustworthiness was the driving force behind the fine crafting of handaxes by Homo erectus/ergaster in the Lower Palaeolithic period.

 As a city that sits astride two continents, Istanbul has always been a strategic gateway between the East and West. But an ambitious railway project is pulling the two continents even closer together with the construction of the world’s deepest submerged tunnel, though earthquakes and archaeology have delayed its construction.

During the investigation of a Bronze Age industrial area in Cyprus, archaeologist Dr. Lindy Crewe uncovered a kiln that was likely used for beer production. This field season, Heritage and Archaeological Research Practice (HARP) ran a field school for experimental archaeology to recreate the kiln and test the brewery theory by making their own beers.

A 2,500-year-old statue of a woman from the late Hellenistic period was found buried in the ancient city walls during the excavations at the Metropolis ancient city in İzmir’s Torbalı district, in Turkey.

The most comprehensive analysis of the Terracotta Army’s weapons has revealed that the craftsmen responsible for arming the 7000 warriors, chariots and horses followed a sophisticated labor model now associated with Toyota, where small workshops produced all the parts of the army from the weapons to the soldiers.

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 11-30-12 Reviewed by on . There are easier places to make wine than the spectacular, desolate landscapes of southeast Turkey, but DNA analysis suggests it is here that Stone Age farmers There are easier places to make wine than the spectacular, desolate landscapes of southeast Turkey, but DNA analysis suggests it is here that Stone Age farmers Rating:
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