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Pirates in Fact and Fiction

When we think of pirates, we think of eye patches, peg legs, and hook hands; the Jolly Roger, drunkenness, wenches, good times, and buried treasure in the form of gold, pearls, and […]

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The Practice of Repairing Vessels in Ancient Egypt: Methods of Repair and Anthropological Implications

Before mass production, the practice of repairing ceramic and stone vessels, as well […]

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Lights on the “Dark Age”

Societal collapse has always been intriguing. For this reason, scholars have been attracted to the Early Bronze IV of the Southern Levant since the early 20th century. […]

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The Generative Power of The Always-Yet-Never-Here Apocalypse

The funny thing about the apocalypse is that it has never happened, and yet it is always in our face and right around the corner. […]

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A Rare Discovery at Tel Achziv: A Phoenician Clay Mask Mold from the Ninth Century B.C.E.

Renewed excavations on the tell of Achziv in the north of Israel by a French-Israeli team have led to the discovery […]

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How to Use Photography to Document Ancient Sites and Why It’s Important

Archaeological excavation photography (AEP) is a means of documentation vital to both the historical and archaeological record. […]

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Masculinities and Third Gender: Gendered Otherness in the Ancient Near East

Their masculine identity was considered to be ambiguous. These persons can be classified as belonging to a third gender. […]

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Lessons Learned from a New Collaborative Archaeological Adventure

It all began over a decade ago. Then Director General of the Department of Antiquities of Jordan (DoA), Fawwaz Al-Kraysheh, sat me down in his office, looked me straight […]

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A Hellenistic Household Ceramic Assemblage from Tell el-Timai (Thmuis), Egypt: A Contextual View

Large deposits of domestic pottery from primary contexts in Ptolemaic Lower Egypt are uncommon and seldom presented in their entirety. […]

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A Clay Bread Stamp from Khirbet et-Tireh

The clay bread stamp presented here was found at in a monastic complex dating to the Late Byzantine-Early Islamic period at Khirbet et-Tireh, approximately 16 km northwest of Jerusalem. […]

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