Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 1-25-13

Posted in: Archaeology in the News, ASOR
Tags:
Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+1Email this to someoneShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on LinkedIn0

New findings from the 2,600-year-old grave of a Celtic woman in Germany suggest the ancient Celts were much more sophisticated than previously thought. The entire tomb was removed from the ground for further excavation in a laboratory and is continuing to reveal new surprises.

A team of researchers led by the UAB has found the first ancient remains of a calcified ovarian teratoma, in the pelvis of the skeleton of a woman from the Roman era. The find confirms the presence in antiquity of this type of tumour – formed by the remains of tissues or organs, which are difficult to locate during the examination of ancient remains. Inside the small round mass, four teeth and a small piece of bone were found.

But the people who lived 1200 years ago in a Utah village known as Site 13, near Canyonlands National Park in Utah, seem to have had at least one indulgence: chocolate. Researchers report that half a dozen bowls excavated from the area contain traces of chocolate, the earliest known in North America.

A long-delayed restoration of the Colosseum’s only intact internal passageway has yielded ancient traces of red, black, green and blue frescoes – as well as graffiti and drawings of phallic symbols – indicating that the arena where gladiators fought was far more colorful than previously thought.

Ancient DNA has revealed that humans living some 40,000 years ago in the area near Beijing were likely related to many present-day Asians and Native Americans.

A sapphire ring found in North Yorkshire has sparked a meeting of experts to determine exactly when it was made. The ring has baffled archaeologists because it is unlike any other according to the Yorkshire Museum.

A recently uncovered archaeological artifact, a broken clay pitcher, was stolen from the Tel Shiloh archaeological site only a few days after its discovery was announced.

By looking at someone’s shoes, you can tell a lot about the person wearing them. That old adage certainly rings true when looking at children’s shoes from ancient Rome. By their sheer existence, kid’s shoes trump the view children were not part of Roman military life.

The Syrian civil war is not the first conflict to complicate Professor Nicolò Marchetti’s efforts to turn Karkemish, an ancient city site on the banks of the Euphrates, on Turkey’s southern border and inside a restricted military zone, into a public archaeology park.

Important medieval frescoes of St. Premte Chapel in the remote village of Valsh in central Albania, have suffered irreparable damage at the hands of thieves who tried to prize them from the walls.

A quest to find 140 British warplanes rumored to have been buried in Burma at the end of World War II has only turned up bundles of electric cables and water pipes, according to a news conferenc

A metric ton of cattle bones found in an abandoned theater in the ancient city of Corinth may mark years of lavish feasting, a new study finds.

For nearly two centuries, musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk’s Field  lay buried just 6 inches below a Maryland cornfield, waiting to tell the story of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America.

~~~

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this blog or found by following any link on this blog. ASOR will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information. ASOR will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. The opinions expressed by Bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of ASOR or any employee thereof.

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+1Email this to someoneShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on LinkedIn0

There are no comments published yet.

Leave a Comment

Sign in to view all ASOR Blog content!
If you have not set up a username and password for the ASOR Blog, please close this box by clicking anywhere on the screen then go to the Friends of ASOR option in the menu above. If you have forgotten your password, please click the Forgot Login Password option in the above menu.