The Archaeology of Conflict and Remembrance at Gallipoli

By: Sarah Midford and Jessie Birkett-Rees The First World War was an unprecedented catastrophe, killing millions and setting Europe on the path to further conflict. The eight month battle for the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915 provides an outstanding example of the entrenched conflicts over strategic patches of land during the ‘Great War.’ However, in spite […]

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The Archaeology of Israel-Palestine in Finland

By: Kirsi Valkama, University of Helsinki Finland is a country of 5.4 million inhabitants, famous for the cell phone manufacturer Nokia, or at least what is left of it. But Finland had long made contributions to archaeology that outstrip its small size. The first person in Finland to become involved in Near Eastern archaeology was […]

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Archaeology for the Masses: Tearing Down the Barriers between Archaeology and the Public

By: Itzick Shai and Joe Uziel Who does archaeology belong to – the few or the many? Sitting in our archaeology labs we often find ourselves delving into small details uncovered in excavations. These questions of how past societies lived, interacted and functioned often seem of little importance to the wider public, which usually takes […]

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Why Zooarchaeology Should Not Be the Neglected Step-Child of Archaeology and Zoology

By: David R. Lipovitch Zooarchaeology, or animal bone archaeology, is a relatively new sub-field of archaeology. While some work was done as early as the 1870s in trying to understand the role animals played in Near Eastern societies, zooarchaeology did not really reach fruition until the 1960s and ‘70s. This stemmed primarily from attempts among […]

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Joint Custody: An Archaeological Park at Neolithic Ghwair I, Jordan

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:* Ecotourism is quickly becoming a means for the public to appreciate archaeological sites, even in remote regions. We are pleased to present this article by Alan Simmons and Mohammad Najjar abridged from the latest edition of Near Eastern Archaeology on a case study from Jordan. By: Alan H. Simmons and Mohammad […]

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An Unholy Quartet: Museum Trustees, Antiquity Dealers, Scientific Experts, and Government Agents

In September 2013 the US returned a silver griffin to Iran as part of a diplomatic overture connected to Iranian president Rouhani’s appearance at the United Nations. But as retired Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Oscar White Muscarella showed in papers published in 2008 and 2012, the object is a fake and cannot be dated […]

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What’s New in Biblical Inscriptions?

By: George Athas Summer[1] is an exciting time, and not just because of the weather. It’s the time the archaeological fraternity dusts off its trowels and spades and sets to work digging the tels. Hopefully there are cohorts of grad students to do most of the dirty work. And hopefully, one of them will stumble […]

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Has Archaeology Gone Overboard in Throwing Out the Bible?

By: Steven Collins The relationship between archaeology and the Bible has been a much-debated topic over the last 25 years. The terms ‘minimalists’ and ‘maximalists’ are now as frequent as ‘exodus’ and ‘epigraphy’. There seems to be little or no middle ground. On the one hand, William Dever is—as he has stated on several occasions—flattered […]

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Archaeology and Cultural Heritage in the New Libya

By: Susan Kane and Sam Carrier, Oberlin College The June 2013 destruction of an ancient necropolis near the UNESCO World Heritage site of Cyrene has drawn international attention to the precarious state of archaeology in Libya. Families living on nearby farms apparently have exerted their claim to ownership by clearing a large area of land […]

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Who Really Built the Water System at Megiddo?

By: Norma Franklin Visitors to Megiddo thrill to the long descent into the famous water system, first climbing down the many steps that surround the gaping chasm dug deep into the tell and then the rock cut shaft followed by a long tunnel cut into the bedrock. But who actually built the water system? In […]

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Current Issues in Israelite Religion

By: Richard S. Hess The archaeology of Israelite religions continues to evoke new evidence and approaches. Recent reassessments raise the question of monotheism in pre-exilic Israel. Put another way, did anyone believe in a single deity before the fall of Jerusalem in 587/6 BCE? The traditional critical view has been that Josiah instituted a (Deuteronomistic) […]

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Breaking Ground at Tel Abel Beth Maacah—Why Dig at the Gateway to the Arameans

By: Robert Mullins and Nava Panitz-Cohen Abel Beth Maacah is an imposing 35-acre mound controlling one of the most strategic passes in northern Israel and has the honor of being the northernmost site in Israel (running neck-and-neck with nearby Tel Dan, but winning by a nostril). It was also ancient Israel’s northern gateway to the […]

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Digging through Data at the Oriental Institute

By: Scott Branting, Jack Green, and Foy Scalf Think back to the time when you last visited a library and flicked through a card catalog to find a book. Card catalogs were made obsolete by computer databases in the 1980s, and were followed by online access to libraries’ collections during the 1990s and 2000s. In […]

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Hazor in the Ninth and Eighth Centuries BCE: From Omri to the Assyrian Destruction.

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:* David and Solomon are controversial historical figures, but their successors, especially the Israelite dynasty of Omri, are not. Hazor was a thriving center of the northern kingdom of Israel. Its extensive remains illustrate the life of Iron Age cities as they fell under the shadow of the Assyrian onslaught. By: Débora […]

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Tel Hazor Ninth and Eighth Centuries B.C.E. Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here’s a gallery of all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C.E. Smaller versions of some of the images also appear in the article “Hazor in the Ninth and Eighth Centuries B.C.E.” on the ASOR Blog / ANE Today which you can read […]

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200 Years of Tourism in the Holy Lands – From Mark Twain to the Digital Age

By: Uzi Baram, Professor of Anthropology at the New College of Florida Heritage Tourism’s Roots in the Grand Tour Heritage contends with nature as the fastest growing parts of the world’s largest industry, tourism. Heritage tourism involves visits, usually leisurely and purposefully enjoyable, to a historically or culturally significant locale. Archaeological sites are particularly attractive for […]

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Hogging the Attention: Cuisine and Culture in Ancient Israel

By: Edward F. Maher The Iron Age of Ancient Israel (1200 – 586 BCE) includes the rise and decline of two well known cultural groups. The interactions between Israel and their nemesis the Philistines are described in the Old Testament that emphasized the differences between their cultures, heritage, and general ways of life. One of […]

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The So-Called “Solomonic” City-gate at Megiddo

Editor’s Note: The “Solomonic” gates at Hazor, Gezer and Megiddo have long been controversial for their apparent confirmation of Biblical accounts. Below, Prof. David Ussishkin, the excavator of Lachish and Megiddo, argues that the six-chambered gate structure at Megiddo cannot be dated to the tenth century and the reign of Solomon. What is the proper […]

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Tel Hazor Iron I and Iron IIa Ages Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here’s a gallery of all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the Iron I and Iron IIa Ages. Smaller versions of some of the images also appear in the article “Hazor in the Tenth Century BCE” on the ASOR Blog / ANE Today which you can read here. […]

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Hazor in the Tenth Century BCE

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:* Few topics are more controversial than the biblical kingdoms of David and Solomon. Were they and their rulers real, and if so, what archaeological remains did they leave? Or were they literary creations, exaggerations or even fabrications of later biblical writers? The arguments have raged for almost three decades without end, […]

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