Mark Schuler Dig Bag

What’s in your dig bag, Mark Schuler?

A typical day pack won’t work at our site. We have a bit of a daily hike up the mountain and must carry everything except large tools. Since basalt tends to be rough on nylon, I use a Maxpedition – Vulture-II™ backpack. It holds 34 liters of […]

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Figure 1. Part of the Chester Beatty papyri showing portions of the Book of Enoch in Greek (P.Mich.inv. 5552; third century C.E), University of Michigan Library)
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:P._Chester_Beatty_XII,_leaf_3,_verso.jpg

Zodiac Calendars and Angelic Teaching in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Angels are often associated with secret knowledge but not usually with authentic mathematics. In several of the Dead Sea Scrolls there is a complicated network of parallel stories in which angels impart secret knowledge of […]

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Top 10 Posts

Top 10 Posts of 2014

As we begin 2015, we’d like to thank all of our Friends of ASOR (and lurkers) who come back to the ASOR Blog to read post after post. Keep reading to see the top 10 posts of 2014! We hope that 2014 was as amazing for all of you as it was for us. Here’s to 2015 being even […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 10-25-13

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! The Home of the Last Neanderthals 250,000 […]

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A Look into Our Past

October is a busy month for the world of Archaeology. There’s the International Archaeology Day (IAD) on October 19th, Archaeological Institute of America’s (AIA) Archaeology Day Fair at the Museum of Science in Boston, and over 300 archaeology events throughout the month in various parts of the world. October also kicks off Archives Month here […]

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An Afternoon at the Museum – The Dead Sea Scrolls

By: Kaitlynn Anderson Saturday, September 21st, was a beautifully sunny, breezy day. I gathered my equipment and headed off to Westborough, MA. My plan? To see Dr. Eric Meyers lecture on the Dead Sea Scrolls and experience the exhibit at the Museum of Science. The lecture took place at the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, and […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 9-06-13

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! Crashed WWII Spitfire being dug up on Salisbury Plain Team of […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 8-30-2013

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! Starting us off this week – ASORTV talked to past fellowship […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 8-23-13

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! Looking for something to do on Saturday, September 21st in Boston? […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 8-16-13

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up this weeks archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! Archaeologists Find Location of Major English Battle  In 1485, Richard […]

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Recipe for Surviving an Archaeological Excavation

By: Marielle Velander, 2013 Meyers Fellow I’m already halfway through my three weeks as an archaeologist at Tel Kabri, a Middle Bronze Age palace in northwestern Israel, my participation made possible by the Meyers Fellowship through the American Schools for Oriental Research (ASOR). I’ve learned a lot already about what is necessary to get through […]

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Digging the Iron Age at Bethsaida

By: Olga Goussev-Sushinsky, 2013 Heritage Fellow For my first archaeological dig, I decided to choose Bethsaida.  The site is located at north-east shore of the Sea of Galilee and is most known for its role in the New Testament. It is also renowned for being the capital of the Biblical kingdom Geshur.  Led by Dr. […]

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Excavating Canaanite remains at Tel Jezreel

By: Ashley Motes, 2013 Heritage Fellow From May to June, I spent four weeks at Tel Jezreel in Israel participating in the Jezreel Expedition. Norma Franklin of Zinman Institute of Archaeology at Israel’s University of Haifa and Jennie Ebeling of University of Evansville were the directors of the project. The focus of the Jezreel Expedition is […]

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Shalom from Huqoq, Israel!

By: Megan Hynek, 2013 Platt Fellowship recipient Deciding to dig in Israel was an easy decision. I am currently a fourth year archaeology student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. All archaeology students there are required to attend a dig field school. We have several options including digs in northern Peru, Mississippi, and […]

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Archaeological Field Work in Egypt After the Revolution

By: James K. Hoffmeier, Trinity International University  On January 25, 2011 the Egyptian revolution that toppled the thirty-year dictatorial reign of Hosni Mubarak began. On February 11th, Mubarak resigned. While the political news gripped much of the world, reports of some looting in the Cairo museum surprised everyone. Though limited in scope, security was quickly […]

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Tel Hazor Bronze Age Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here’s a gallery all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the Middle and Late Bronze Ages. Smaller versions of some of the images also appear to illustrate the abridged version of the article on Hazor’s Ceremonial Precinct found on the ASOR Blog / ANE Today which you can […]

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The Ceremonial Precinct in the Upper City of Hazor: What Does the Identification As a Temple or Palace Have to Do With Joshua’s Conquest?

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:*  Hazor, “the head of all those kingdoms,” has a unique place in Biblical Archaeology. It is the largest tell in the Southern Levant, and a city-state whose importance resonated throughout the Middle and Late Bronze Ages. Hazor is also specifically named in the Book of Joshua as one of the enemies […]

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A Toast to Our Fermented Past: Case Studies in the Experimental Archaeology of Alcoholic Beverages

By: Kevin M. Cullen  Archaeologists and historians are constantly in pursuit of the tangible human past, whether it is in the form of material culture or primary written sources.  This direct evidence of the past can still leave us disconnected from the full context in which the technology or writings were employed.  Therefore, one exciting […]

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The Big Dig Video Roundup

Sites and Finds Deep Time at Tall Hisban, Jordan In Focus: Abel Beth Maacah (more…)

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Near Eastern Archaeology in Malta

By: Anthony J. Frendo The Maltese archipelago lies practically at the centre of the Mediterranean, roughly midway between the eastern and the western Mediterranean Sea, and between the island of Sicily to its north and Libya to its south. Given this unusual location – between the Near East and Classical worlds and at the epicenter […]

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