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AIAR Archives - The ASOR Blog

The Context of Ancient Egyptian Statuary in the Levant

The presence of Egyptian material culture in the Levant has long intrigued scholars in the fields of Levantine archaeology and Egyptology alike as evidence […]

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Who is Who in the Ur III Dynasty

Drehem is a small village situated seven kilometers south of Nippur, the religious center of Sumer and Akkad. The site was extensively looted in 1909-1910 and its clay tablets were brought […]

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Roast and Toast of Retiring Albright Director, Sy Gitin [Video]

At the 2013 ASOR Annual Meeting, we gathered to celebrate the career of Sy Gitin. Sy became director of the Albright Institute (formerly) […]

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Introduction to Archaeology and the New Testament (Mandarin Language)

There are currently few resources available in the Mandarin language for the study of the archaeology of Israel/Palestine as it relates […]

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Travels Through Time: Imagining Migration in the Early Aegean

As a student, I had travelled and excavated in other parts of the Middle East (Jordan and Lebanon) before, but had never visited Israel […]

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The Roots of Violence: The Lesson from the Southern Levant

By: Issa Sarie, Al-Quds University 2012-2013 Kathleen S. Brooks Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The research, which was a joint project with Prof. Israel Hershkovitz of Tel Aviv University, aimed to analyze the range and nature of violence experienced by prehistoric and historic (urban) populations based on their skeletal remains recovered from various […]

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The Dynamics of Dream-Vision Discourse in the Aramaic Dead Sea Scrolls

By: Andrew Perrin, McMaster University, Canada 2012-2013 George A. Barton Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research Although it has been sixty-five years since the initial discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the full critical publication of these materials from the mid to late Second Temple period was only completed within the last few years. […]

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An Investigation into the Figurative Expressions of Ancient Egyptian in Different Text Genres

By: Shih-Wei Hsu, Free University, Berlin 2012-2013 Noble Group Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research During my award period, I continued to work on my dissertation thesis, which deals with figurative expressions in Ancient Egyptian texts, especially royal inscriptions. The dissertation consists of three parts: the first part is an introduction to the study […]

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Legitimacy of Kingship in Biblical Narrative and Chinese Classic Shu: A Comparative Study

Dr. Yan Wang, Shandong University, China 2012-2013 Noble Group Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The comparative study I conducted at the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research during my tenure as a Noble Group Fellow focused on the legitimacy of kingship in the Hebrew Bible and in a Chinese classic Shu (Book of Historical […]

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Persia and the East: Relationship between Central Asia and the Achaemenid Empire

Wu Xin, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University 2012-2013 Noble Group Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research During the last decade, the focus of scholarship on the Achaemenid empire (ca. 550-330 B.C.) has gradually shifted from a study of the overall structure of the empire on the basis of […]

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Egyptian and Egyptianized Material in Late Bronze Age Canaan: An Examination of Cultural Identity

By: Krystal V.L. Pierce, University of California, Los Angeles 2012-2013 Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The research I was able to conduct while in residence at the Albright resulted in the completion of my Ph.D. dissertation at UCLA entitled, Living and Dying Abroad: Aspects of Egyptian Cultural Identity in […]

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A Hotbed of Healing: Ritual Cures in Roman Palestine

By: Megan Nutzman, University of Chicago 2012-2013 Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research My dissertation looks at ritual healing in Roman and late antique Syria-Palestine.  Significant scholarly work has been done in the areas of “magical” healing, through the use of amulets and incantations, and on localized healing cults, such […]

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The Bioarchaeology of Agriculture in the Prehistoric Southern Levant

By: Matthew A. Gasperetti, University of Cambridge Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellowship which I held at the Albright Institute this year gave me access to world-class bibliographic resources in Jerusalem as well as to an international community of scholars, both of which proved […]

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Baal and the Problem of Politics in the Bronze Age

By: Aaron Tugendhaft, New York University National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research My research explores the intersections between conceptions of the divine, forms of human artistic making, and the foundations of politics in the Near East. As an NEH Fellow at the Albright Institute from December, 2012 to March, […]

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The Mystery of Existence: The Construction of Authority in 4QInstruction

By: Benjamin Wold, Trinity College Dublin National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research In late 1947, a small fragment (1Q26) of a previously unknown Hebrew document was discovered in Cave 1 near Khirbet Qumran. In 1952, at least six more manuscripts of this same text were found in Cave 4 […]

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“A Bathtub Murder”: (Re)Investigating Mesopotamian Bathtub Coffins

By: Laura B. Mazow, East Carolina University National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research Bath-shaped basins dated to the Bronze and Iron Ages, discovered in both burial and habitation contexts, have been interpreted as either burial coffins or bathing tubs that reflect immigration or elite emulation of foreign traditions. I […]

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Greek Architecture and the Near East

Philip Sapirstein, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research I have pursued several projects this year during my time as an NEH Fellow at the Albright. As a specialist in the architecture of ancient Greece, I came to the Albright to examine […]

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Final Report on the Archaeological Excavations at Khirbet Qana: Field II, the Synagogue

Tom McCollough, Centre College, Annual Professor W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The excavations of Khirbet Qana, a village in the lower Galilee region located 6 km east of Sepphoris and 15 km west of Tiberias, began in 1998. Initiated by the late Douglas Edwards, the principle aim was to integrate the archaeological data from urban […]

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Jewish Popular Piety in Late Antiquity

Michael L. Satlow, Brown University Seymour Gitin Distinguished Professor W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The four and a half months that I spent as the Seymour Gitin Distinguished Professor at the Albright Institute have been among the most productive and intellectually stimulating of my career.  I entered the fellowship with two goals: (1) to […]

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Ten Years after Iraq: Archaeology, Archaeologists, and U.S. Foreign Relations

By: Morag M. Kersel and Christina Luke Ten years ago, in April of 2003, a coalition led by the United States invaded Iraq. This quickly toppled the Ba’athist regime of Saddam Hussein but also resulted in the loss of life, local unrest, displacement, and the ransacking of cultural institutions, archives, libraries, and the national museum […]

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