“Syrian Heritage Initiative a Natural Fit for ASOR,” Featuring Dr. Susan Ackerman

Last year ASOR had two firsts – our first female president, and a $600,000 cooperative agreement with the Department of State. At the 2014 ASOR Annual Meeting, I sat down with ASOR President […]

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Top 10 Posts of 2014

As we begin 2015, we’d like to thank all of our Friends of ASOR (and lurkers) who come back to the ASOR Blog to read post after post. Keep reading to see the top 10 posts of 2014! We hope that 2014 was as amazing for all of you as it was for us. Here’s to 2015 being even […]

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FOA Podcast, “A Look Inside BASOR,” Featuring Professors Rollston and Cline

In this episode of the Friends of ASOR podcast, we go behind the scenes for an inside look at the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (BASOR). We’re talking with […]

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Breaking In: Women’s Representation in Archaeology

By: Valerie Schlegel Undergraduate Judaic Studies Major at The University of Arizona March is Women’s History Month, which highlights the achievements women have made in a variety of disciplines. When thinking about women in the field of archeology, one wonders how often are women found in leadership positions. To answer this question, I have been […]

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Choosing Islamic Archaeology, Mentoring and Directing, and Looking to the Future

EnglishEnglishFrenchPowered by TranslateBy: Dr. Bethany J. Walker Annemarie Schimmel Kolleg, University of Bonn When I was asked to contribute to ASOR’s blog posts celebrating women in Middle Eastern archaeology, I was honored and perplexed. My personal story is not particularly special or interesting, in my eyes. I am happy to share it, however, as it […]

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5 Reasons to Become a Friend of ASOR

In early 2013, the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) created Friends of ASOR (FOA). Friends of ASOR are people interested in archaeological and historical research in the eastern Mediterranean. Since being founded in 1900, ASOR has supported and encouraged the study of the cultures and history of the Near East, from the earliest times […]

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Saving Archaeological Heritage in Afghanistan

By: Hans Curvers Former coordinating archeologist at Mes Aynak  During a crisis or conflict, interventions first focus on emergency relief. Once the ‘post-conflict stage’ is reached, the focus shifts to reconstruction. As soon as peace and stability are restored, the exit strategy starts. A straightforward linear process. Where does archaeology fit in? In the Afghan reality, […]

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American Schools of Oriental Research Call for New Member-Organized Sessions and New Workshop Sessions Proposals

By: LeeAnn Barnes Gordon ASOR 2014 November 19-22nd, 2014 San Diego, CA PROPOSAL SUBMISSION DEADLINE: DECEMBER 15 Please visit the ASOR webpage to read the Call For Papers and submit a proposal. The ASOR Annual Meeting provides a venue for scholars, students, and interested members of the public to come together for three and a […]

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“The Territory Facing Jaffa”: Cultural Landscapes of a Mediterranean Port and its Hinterland

By: George A. Pierce, University of California, Los Angeles 2012-2013 Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The ancient mound of Jaffa, situated on the southern Levantine coast south of the outlet of the Yarkon River, was the closest maritime outlet for inland centers in ancient times. Jaffa has the distinct […]

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Why Zooarchaeology Should Not Be the Neglected Step-Child of Archaeology and Zoology

By: David R. Lipovitch Zooarchaeology, or animal bone archaeology, is a relatively new sub-field of archaeology. While some work was done as early as the 1870s in trying to understand the role animals played in Near Eastern societies, zooarchaeology did not really reach fruition until the 1960s and ‘70s. This stemmed primarily from attempts among […]

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Jewish Popular Piety in Late Antiquity

Michael L. Satlow, Brown University Seymour Gitin Distinguished Professor W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The four and a half months that I spent as the Seymour Gitin Distinguished Professor at the Albright Institute have been among the most productive and intellectually stimulating of my career.  I entered the fellowship with two goals: (1) to […]

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Atarah in the Archives: Nelson Glueck’s Canine Companion

By: Cynthia Rufo-McCormick, ASOR Archivist and Website Manager A few months ago, while transcribing diaries from the Nelson Glueck Papers, we came across a short, curious entry penned by Glueck on December 12, 1938:  “Dec. 12, 1938. Atarah was married at 3:00 P.M. to Nimrud, owned by Mr. Amitai. Unfortunately, it developed subsequently, that Atarah’s father is […]

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Has Archaeology Gone Overboard in Throwing Out the Bible?

By: Steven Collins The relationship between archaeology and the Bible has been a much-debated topic over the last 25 years. The terms ‘minimalists’ and ‘maximalists’ are now as frequent as ‘exodus’ and ‘epigraphy’. There seems to be little or no middle ground. On the one hand, William Dever is—as he has stated on several occasions—flattered […]

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Archaeology and Cultural Heritage in the New Libya

By: Susan Kane and Sam Carrier, Oberlin College The June 2013 destruction of an ancient necropolis near the UNESCO World Heritage site of Cyrene has drawn international attention to the precarious state of archaeology in Libya. Families living on nearby farms apparently have exerted their claim to ownership by clearing a large area of land […]

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Who Really Built the Water System at Megiddo?

By: Norma Franklin Visitors to Megiddo thrill to the long descent into the famous water system, first climbing down the many steps that surround the gaping chasm dug deep into the tell and then the rock cut shaft followed by a long tunnel cut into the bedrock. But who actually built the water system? In […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 10-4-13

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! Robotic Snakes Slither Their Way Into Ancient Archaeology Archaeologists say robotic […]

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A Look into Our Past

October is a busy month for the world of Archaeology. There’s the International Archaeology Day (IAD) on October 19th, Archaeological Institute of America’s (AIA) Archaeology Day Fair at the Museum of Science in Boston, and over 300 archaeology events throughout the month in various parts of the world. October also kicks off Archives Month here […]

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Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 9-27-13

If you missed anything from the ASOR facebook or twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! Spectacular tombs from the early Middle Ages […]

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An Afternoon at the Museum – The Dead Sea Scrolls

By: Kaitlynn Anderson Saturday, September 21st, was a beautifully sunny, breezy day. I gathered my equipment and headed off to Westborough, MA. My plan? To see Dr. Eric Meyers lecture on the Dead Sea Scrolls and experience the exhibit at the Museum of Science. The lecture took place at the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, and […]

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