Tim Harrison Sea Peoples Tayinat

Sea Peoples in North Syria and the Mediterranean Coast

Who were the Philistines? The Israelites’ greatest enemy, and their relationship to the Sea Peoples at the end of the Late Bronze Age, continues to fascinate scholars and the public alike. But new interpretations of […]

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Tell Jemmeh, July 2012. Photo by A. Joffe.

Publishing the Tell Jemmeh Excavations, 40 years later

Opportunities arise in unusual ways. But the opportunity to help publish a major excavation is by definition unusual. During the summer of 2008, while I was towards the end of a post doctorate term at the Weizmann Institute in Israel, […]

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Cities of Desire

By: Ömür Harmanşah Cities Between Imagination and Political Desire In his Invisible Cities, the Italian writer Italo Calvino wrote that “cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else.” Study of ancient cities has […]

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The Land Between the Two Rivers: Early Israelite Identities in Transjordan

By: Thomas Petter, Associate Professor at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary Were there Israelites in Transjordan in the early Iron Age? How would we know from archaeology? Or if not Israelites (and Moabites), whom should we be looking for? The task of plotting identities in the past is tricky business. It becomes even more problematic when opinions diverge […]

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A Nabataean temple was discovered at the Dibon site in 1952. Here, workers remove part of a wall.

Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 2-21-14

If you missed anything from the ASOR Facebook or Twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section! [list type=”icons-book”] A linguistics professor claims he’s decoded 10 words […]

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Plan of Khirbet Iskandar gate.

Surviving Collapse: Khirbat Iskandar, Jordan in the EB IV Period

By: Suzanne Richard, Professor Department of History and Archaeology; Department of Theology Director, The Collins Institute for Archaeological Research and the Archaeology Museum Gallery at Gannon Calamity, upheaval, and dislocation, whether wrought by human disasters such as war or natural agents such as earthquake and climate change, eventually face all societies. But in an era of […]

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Palaces of the Mediterranean Bronze Age

Every year at the ASOR Annual Meeting, the Projects on Parade Poster Session takes place. It’s an ideal opportunity to see the types of projects (both field and publication) that ASOR members are involved with. This year, North Carolina State University graduate student Jesica Lewis presented her poster, “Palaces of the Mediterranean Bronze Age.” She […]

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Egyptian and Egyptianized Material in Late Bronze Age Canaan: An Examination of Cultural Identity

By: Krystal V.L. Pierce, University of California, Los Angeles 2012-2013 Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research The research I was able to conduct while in residence at the Albright resulted in the completion of my Ph.D. dissertation at UCLA entitled, Living and Dying Abroad: Aspects of Egyptian Cultural Identity in […]

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Aaron Tugendhaft

Baal and the Problem of Politics in the Bronze Age

By: Aaron Tugendhaft, New York University National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research My research explores the intersections between conceptions of the divine, forms of human artistic making, and the foundations of politics in the Near East. As an NEH Fellow at the Albright Institute from December, 2012 to March, […]

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Tel Hazor Bronze Age Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here’s a gallery all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the Middle and Late Bronze Ages. Smaller versions of some of the images also appear to illustrate the abridged version of the article on Hazor’s Ceremonial Precinct found on the ASOR Blog / ANE Today which you can […]

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The Ceremonial Precinct in the Upper City of Hazor: What Does the Identification As a Temple or Palace Have to Do With Joshua’s Conquest?

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:*  Hazor, “the head of all those kingdoms,” has a unique place in Biblical Archaeology. It is the largest tell in the Southern Levant, and a city-state whose importance resonated throughout the Middle and Late Bronze Ages. Hazor is also specifically named in the Book of Joshua as one of the enemies […]

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Near Eastern Archaeology in Malta

By: Anthony J. Frendo The Maltese archipelago lies practically at the centre of the Mediterranean, roughly midway between the eastern and the western Mediterranean Sea, and between the island of Sicily to its north and Libya to its south. Given this unusual location – between the Near East and Classical worlds and at the epicenter […]

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The Renewed Hazor Excavations

By: Amnon Ben-Tor, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Edited and abridged from NEA 76.2 (2013): 66–67 (see editorial note below) Tel Hazor, “the head of all those kingdoms” (Joshua 11:10), is the largest tell in Israel and encompasses a total of approximately 800 dunams (200 acres). With the exception of two gaps in the settlement, […]

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Augmented Reality, a New Horizon in Archaeology

By: Stuart Eve, University College London and L – P : Archaeology Firstly, I would like to thank Jen Fitzgerald for asking me to contribute a guest post to the ASOR Blog. I am currently undertaking a doctoral thesis at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London – researching the middle ground between phenomenological, in […]

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The Virtual World Project: Touring The Ancient World

By: Ronald A. Simkins and Nicolae Roddy, Creighton University There is nothing quite like teaching at an archaeological site, where ancient remains almost speak out to students as witnesses of the past. Both authors have led study tours in Israel, taking students to archaeological sites like Tel Dan, Bethsaida, Megiddo, Arad, Beer-sheba, and others, lecturing […]

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The Relationship of Egypt and its Vassals as Reflected in the Amarna Tablets

By: Yuan Zhihui, Tianjin Normal University, China, Noble Group Fellow During my four-and-a-half month fellowship at the Albright, my research project focused on “The Relationship of Egypt and its Vassals as Reflected in the Amarna Tablets.” The aim of the project was to reveal the diplomatic system between Egypt and its vassal states in Canaan. […]

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The Origins of the Early States in China and Israel: Through A Comparative Study

By: Xinhui Luo, Beijing Normal University, China, Noble Group Fellow During my fellowship at the Albright, my main project was entitled “Ideology of the Early State: East and West.” The goal of this project was to examine the ideologies of the early states in Mesopotamia and in China, and to find the similarities and the […]

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The Emergence of Social Complexity: Changes in Animal Management Strategies between the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age in the Near East

By: Austin C. Hill, University of Connecticut, Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow The Chalcolithic to Early Bronze Age transition in the southern Levant has long been considered a threshold event in the development of social complexity in the Near East.  Societies are argued to have shifted from small scale, village-based chiefdoms to true “urban” or […]

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Metal Implements and Tool Marks from the Levantine Second Millennium BC

By: Nicholas Blackwell, Bryn Mawr College, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, AIAR Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow The primary purpose of my Spring 2012 fellowship at the Albright Institute was to compile an extensive dataset of metal tools from the Levantine second millennium BC. This research began to round out the previously-incomplete Levantine […]

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The Chalcolithic to Early Bronze Age (EB) Transition – Investigation of a Weak Link

By: Eliot Braun, National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow  My tenure as an NEH Fellow at the Albright was exceptionally productive as it freed me to direct virtually all my energies into research and writing related to the above project. I was able to complete an article in which I challenge some scholars’ interpretations suggesting […]

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