General view of the site of Tell es-Sultan/ancient Jericho from south, with the Middle Bronze Age (1900-1550 BC) fortification works at the southern side of the tell. All photos courtesy of Lorenzo Nigro.

Tell Es-Sultan – A Pilot Project for Archaeology in Palestine

By: Lorenzo Nigro, University of Rome La Sapienza In a few weeks students and young scholars of Rome “La Sapienza” University, along with Palestinian colleagues from the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, will return to Tell es-Sultan. The site – identified since late antiquity with Biblical Jericho, the Canaanite city-state of Rwha –is the most visited […]

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A Hotbed of Healing: Ritual Cures in Roman Palestine

By: Megan Nutzman, University of Chicago 2012-2013 Educational and Cultural Affairs Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research My dissertation looks at ritual healing in Roman and late antique Syria-Palestine.  Significant scholarly work has been done in the areas of “magical” healing, through the use of amulets and incantations, and on localized healing cults, such […]

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Follow up: The Archaeology of WWI in Palestine

By: Jeffrey A. Blakely This post is a reply to comments on Jeff Blakely’s previous post The Archaeology of World War I in Palestine and the Beginning of the Modern Middle East. Robert Merrillees praised the post but asked why Australian records had not been mentioned. I greatly appreciate the comments of Ambassador Merrillees and […]

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The Archaeology of World War I in Palestine and the Beginning of the Modern Middle East

By: Jeffrey A. Blakely Most Americans understand World War I in the Middle East through the epic 1962 film Lawrence of Arabia. Who can forget Peter O’Toole’s vibrant blue eyes as he blew up trains on the Hejaz railroad in modern Saudi Arabia and Jordan? Since American forces were not involved in the Egyptian/Palestine front, […]

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Terracotta Oil Lamps from Qumran and Ein Feshkha (R. de Vaux’s Excavations, 1951-1958): Typology, Chronology and the Question of Manufacturing Centers

By: Jolanta Mlynarczyk, University of Warsaw, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow The aim of my research at the Albright was to study an assemblage of ca. 200 oil lamps discovered at Qumran by archaeologists from the Ecole Biblique at the settlement itself and in the caves (1951-1956) as well as at Ein Feshkha (1958). The importance […]

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Texts without Qumran and Qumran without Texts: Searching for the Latrines

By: James D. Tabor, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte  On the other days they dig a small pit, a foot deep, with a paddle of the sort given them when they are first admitted among them; and covering themselves round with their garment, that they may not affront the rays of God, they ease themselves […]

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From Destruction to Archaeology: the significance of “Operation Anchor” for the Cultural Heritage of Jaffa.

By: Martin Peilstöcker  During spring 1936 the nationalistic uprising of the Palestinian Arab population against Mandatory British rule and Jewish mass immigration became more and more violent. A strike was declared on Jaffa port, in those days still one of most important harbors of Palestine. Groups of Palestinians left the narrow alleys of the Old […]

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Qumran Month Comes to a Close

It has been a successful month here on the ASOR blog, with posts by many leading scholars on all aspects of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls! We have had seven posts covering everything from the archaeological evidence for a sect inhabiting the site of Qumran, to translations and interpretations of portions of the Dead […]

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Sectarianism and the Archaeology of Qumran

By: Eyal Regev In a couple of articles published in BASOR and Revue de Qumran[1], I have analyzed the social aspects of the inhabitants of kh. Qumran using social-scientific theories, without direct consideration of the scrolls. I have examined the spatial organization and architecture of kh. Qumran using Hillier and Hanson’s Space Syntax Theory, commonly […]

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Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls

EnglishEnglishFrenchPowered by Translate By: Jodi Magness Qumran – the site associated with the Dead Sea Scrolls – is located eight and a half miles south of Jericho, by the northwest shore of the Dead Sea.  The site was excavated from 1951-1956 by Roland de Vaux of the École Biblique et Archéologique Française de Jerusalem.  More recently, […]

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Ossified Territory and Theaters of the Absurd: Personal Reflections on Taking Students beyond the River

By:  Elena D. Corbett, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College The views expressed here are those of the author. Please see the full disclaimer at the end of this essay. Quite by accident at what is still a fairly early point in my career, I have been at the helm of several study abroad opportunities […]

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Update on ASOR’s strategic plan

Strategic plan adopted by ASOR board. It is with great pleasure we announce that on April 24, 2010, the ASOR board of trustees unanimously adopted the “Strategic Plan as a blueprint to move ASOR forward.” A considerable amount of work has been done by the Strategic Planning Task Force that was chaired by ASOR President […]

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WAC Ramallah Conference

Posted by Morag Kersel on behalf of the World Archaeological Conference True to its foundational principles, the World Archaeological Congress will hold its first “Middle East” meeting to focus on the powerful relationship between archaeology, heritage and politics. The archaeology of the West Bank and its surrounding region is enormously significant as the location where […]

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