seven churches ANET May

Living and Working in the Shadow of the Seven Churches

I first came to Turkey in 1992 during my doctoral research on the Book of Revelations. My visit to the Seven Churches – the seven early churches or congregations mention in the Book of Revelations – was life-changing. The […]

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Tim Harrison Sea Peoples Tayinat

Sea Peoples in North Syria and the Mediterranean Coast

Who were the Philistines? The Israelites’ greatest enemy, and their relationship to the Sea Peoples at the end of the Late Bronze Age, continues to fascinate scholars and the public alike. But new interpretations of […]

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Valerie Schlegel at an excavation.

Breaking In: Women’s Representation in Archaeology

By: Valerie Schlegel Undergraduate Judaic Studies Major at The University of Arizona March is Women’s History Month, which highlights the achievements women have made in a variety of disciplines. When thinking about women in the field of archeology, one wonders how often are women found in leadership positions. To answer this question, I have been […]

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Common Ground: Archaeological Practice and Local Communities in Southeastern Turkey

What is the proper relationship between archaeologist and a local community? Whose needs have priority? In this abridged piece from Near Eastern Archaeology, Melissa Rosenzweig and Laurent Dissard put this in concrete terms – when a family wants to bury a loved one on an archaeological site. By: Melissa Rosenzweig and Laurent Dissard For excavations […]

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Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) Newsletter

TURKEY, JUNE 2013 — Theoretical Archaeology Group Meetings, which were initiated in UK in 1979, have been carried out in many countries since then. In 2012, autumn Fahri Dikkaya (Bilkent University) and Çiler Çilingiroğlu (Ege University) initiated TAG-Turkey and assembled the Turkish group for Theoretical Archaeology. Regarding the practice of theoretical archaeological methods worldwide, the major aim […]

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Archaeology after the Arab Spring

By: Jesse Casana The transformative political events in the Middle East over the past two years have had, among many other unexpected outcomes, profound effects on the direction of research in Near Eastern archaeology.  War and civil unrest act as both a carrot and a stick, forcing the cessation of fieldwork in some areas, while […]

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More than Just Airfare: ASOR’s Good Investment

By: Mehrnoush Soroush, 2012 Heritage Fellow In the summer of 2012, I received an ASOR fellowship to join a field project in central Turkey, in the region of Cappadocia. Elsewhere, I described my immense happiness about receiving the fellowship and the invaluable experiences I gained in the field. Here, I would like to write about […]

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A Monumental Surprise in Turkey

By: Dylan Johnson, 2012 Heritage Fellow ASOR’s Heritage Fellowship afforded me, along with many other students with an interest in Near Eastern archaeology, the opportunity to participate in archaeological excavations throughout the Near East. This past summer, I worked at Tell Taʾyinat, a small site in the southwestern province of Hatay, Turkey, close to the […]

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The transformation of the Metropolis of Myra into an Ottoman village

By: Ebru Fatma Fındık Research Assistant Hacettepe University, Faculty of Letters, Department of Art History, Beytepe, Ankara / TURKEY The ancient city of Myra (mod. Demre) is situated in a plain of Lycia, surrounded by the Taurus Mountains to the north and by the Myros River (mod. Demra Çayı) to the east. Located to the […]

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The Cultural Afterlife of Mosaics in Turkey

By: Laurent Dissard, University of Pennsylvania Sensational discoveries of mosaics periodically make the headlines of newspapers in Turkey. After being discovered, unearthed, cleaned, and removed, these ancient floors slowly make their way to museums or private collections. For this month’s ASOR Blog on the Archaeology of Anatolia, I wish to examine the curious afterlife of mosaics […]

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Basalt Connections at Zincirli Hoyuk

By: Leann Pace and Eudora Struble When Eudora and I began graduate school together at the University of Chicago, I don’t believe either of us was planning to work on a long-term archaeological project in Turkey. Eudora was very involved with archaeology in Jordan and my limited experience led me to believe that I wanted […]

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The Gordion Furniture Project

By: Krysia Spirydowicz, Associate Professor, Art Conservation Program, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, CANADA and Senior Conservator, Gordion Furniture Project, Ankara, TURKEY The ancient Phrygian capital of Gordion in central Anatolia was first explored in the early 1950s by a team from the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Located approximately 100 km southwest […]

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Prehistoric Anatolia and the Archeology of Warfare

By: Stephanie Selover, PhD Candidate, the University of Chicago My dissertation project centers on the study of evidence of warfare from Chalcolithic to Early Bronze Age Central and Southeastern Anatolia.  To date, research on the subject of warfare in the Ancient Near East in general and Anatolia in particular has been largely limited to overviews that […]

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Ulucak: A Prehistoric Mound in Aegean Turkey

Özlem Çevik (Archaeology Dept., University of Thrace, Edirne, Turkey) and Çiler Çilingiroğlu (Dept of Protohistory and Near Eastern Archaeology, Izmir, Turkey) Ulucak is a settlement mound located 25 km east of İzmir, in western Turkey (Fig. 1). The mound contains cultural accumulations spanning periods from the Early Neolithic to Late Roman-Early Byzantine periods. The lengthy […]

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From History and Myth, Anatolians in Mycenaean Greece

By: Josh Cannon, University of Chicago The Late Bronze Age (LBA) of Anatolia is a period that has been described to us through history and myth. The history of LBA Anatolia comes primarily from the Hittites, who actively created and maintained records. Written in cuneiform, these records provide us with a wealth of information ranging […]

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Finally underway at Zincirli Höyük, Turkey!

By: Jordan Skornik, University of Chicago Divinity School After a later-than-usual start due to Ramadan, the 7th season of the Neubauer Expedition to Zincirli (ancient Sam’al), an archaeological project of the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute, began in earnest. Digging officially commenced at dawn on Saturday, August 25, and with only one week under our belts, […]

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Scooping Frogs and Excavating Statues in Turkey

By: Emily Coate, 2012 Heritage Fellow The generosity of those behind the ASOR Heritage Fellowship afforded me my first opportunity to dig at a Near Eastern site. I participated in the excavations at Tell Tayinat, a settlement occupied during the Early Bronze and Iron Ages located in southern Turkey near the Syrian border. You may […]

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Contested Heritage and the New Museum(s) in Diyarbakır

By: Laurent Dissard The southeastern provinces of Turkey will soon be home to a series of new, state-of-the-art, archaeology museums. Such buildings are being (or have already been) planned, constructed, remodeled, or expanded. The Gaziantep Museum, for instance, houses many of the Roman mosaics of Zeugma unearthed before the construction of the Birecik Dam. Other […]

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Archaeological Conservation Strategies in the Near East, Fri. Nov. 16

By: Suzanne Davis and LeeAnn Barnes Gordon This year we are pleased to announce a new workshop session for the ASOR Annual Meeting, Archaeological Conservation Strategies in the Near East. Both conservators and archaeologists tend to present research within their own fields, effectively segregating the disciplines. But this year, thanks to ASOR, we have an […]

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Heritage Fellow experiences first dig in picturesque Cappadocia

By: Mehrnoush Soroush, 2012 Heritage Fellow I received the Heritage Fellowship to participate in my first fieldwork at the site of Kınık Höyük, in Cappadocia. Kınık Höyük is close to the small city of Altunhisar, and Niğde is the closest real town where we spent several free Saturday afternoons. I cannot think of a better […]

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