Resources on the Cultural Crisis in the Near East

Posted in: Ancient Near East Today, ASOR
Tags:
Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+1Email this to someoneShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on LinkedIn0

The scale of the human crisis in Syria has expanded and now involves Europe. Damage to archaeological and heritage sites also continues at an alarming rate. We present here a series of new and important links discussing the ongoing cultural disaster.


Reports and Analyses

Cultural Heritage Initiative Weekly Report 61–62 (September 30, 2015 – October 13, 2015), ASOR.
ASOR’s Cultural Heritage Initiative’s weekly review of damage to sites inside Syria.

Damage to Syria’s Heritage, 29 November 2015, Heritage for Peace.
A summary of news and links.

The Finance of Global Terrorism Through Cultural Property Crime in Syria and Northern Iraq
ASOR’s CHI director Michael Danti’s Congressional testimony.

Monumental Fight: Countering the Islamic State’s Antiquities Trafficking, Foundation for Defense of Democracies
A report on the Islamic State’s antiquities economy by a former CIA analyst and ANEToday’s editor.


The Cultural Heritage Crisis in the Middle East

Near Eastern Archaeology, Vol. 78, No. 3, September 2015
A special issue of ASOR’s Near Eastern Archaeology with articles on the crisis in Syria and Iraq.


News items

War, More Than ISIS, Is Destroying Syria’s Ancient Sites

Expert Panel Urges Passage of Bill Protecting Syrian Antiquities

Hollande proposes that Syrian antiquities be brought to France for safekeeping

Antiquities, looted from Syria’s Palmyra Museum, seized while for sale in eastern Turkey? No.

How the Islamic State makes its money

Culture and jihad, grimly connected through the art market’s “blood antiquities”

Syrian Antiquities Chief Calls For Help From International Community

The art detective fighting to save Syria’s past  


Multimedia

Is it too Late to Save Syria’s Antiquities?

CBC Radio,  Who Owns Ancient Art? Part 1, (Listen to Full Episode 54:00‘). ‘Who Owns Ancient Art? Part 2‘, (Listen to Full Episode 53:59.)


Online resources

Antiquities Trafficking and Art Crime at the University of Glasgow

~~~

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this blog or found by following any link on this blog. ASOR will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information. ASOR will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. The opinions expressed by Bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of ASOR or any employee thereof.

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+1Email this to someoneShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on LinkedIn0
Sign in to view all ASOR Blog content!
If you have not set up a username and password for the ASOR Blog, please close this box by clicking anywhere on the screen then go to the Friends of ASOR option in the menu above. If you have forgotten your password, please click the Forgot Login Password option in the above menu.